2021's gaming deals already doubled last year's – Axios

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Image courtesy of The Embracer Group
The scale of deals in gaming in 2021 is already double the full dollar amount from 2020, according to a new industry report.
Why it matters: 2021 has seen a dizzying amount of mergers, acquisitions and investments as everyone wants in on the sector, and as the big players already inside it are spending a lot to get bigger.
Between the lines: Industry analysts at Drake Star Partners have counted some 844 transactions in the first nine months of this year, totaling $71 billion for announced and/or closed deals.
The big picture: Investment isn’t settling on any one thing, as outsiders buy in (Netflix purchasing its first studio), midsize publishers try to grow (see studio purchases by Team17 and Focus) and larger players (Zynga, Roblox, ByteDance) expand.
The bottom line: While a lot of money is changing hands, it’s unclear what all this activity does in terms of game quality and player happiness, which tend to truly determine success.
Image: Nintendo
Nintendo’s mighty crossover game, “Super Smash Bros. Ultimate,” capped off three years of ambitious expansion with the announcement that “Kingdom Hearts” hero Sora will be added to the Switch fighting game’s roster on Oct. 18.
Why it matters: This wasn’t just the addition of a character that had secretly topped Nintendo’s official fan request poll six years ago. It was a stream watched by more than 500,000 people that demonstrated the convergence of some of the industry’s major trends.
Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios
Less than 1% of funds from the top 25 venture capital and private equity firms wind up in the hands of Latino-owned businesses despite the fast pace of Hispanics opening up new enterprises, a study found.
Why it matters: The meager VC and PE investment going to Latinos highlights the lack of capital Hispanic face when trying to launch businesses, and prevents growth in one of the fastest-growing segments of the U.S. economy.
Cargo ships filled with containers wait offshore for entry to the Port of Los Angeles or Port of Long Beach on Oct. 6, 2021, off the coast of San Pedro, California. Photo: Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images
The U.S. Coast Guard is investigating whether the Rotterdam Express, a massive German-flagged cargo ship, could have played a role in causing the 127,000-gallon oil spill in Southern California waters, AP reports.
Driving the news: U.S. Coast Guard investigators boarded the cargo ship on Wednesday as part of the investigation into the cause of the oil spill, which is among the largest in recent California history.

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